How to create healthy parent-child relationship

Research psychologist at Clymbe. She aspires to dwell deeper into mental health in education through art and experimental theories.

Sanyukta Singh

March 1, 2021

While playing the role of a parent for years, many adults put themselves in a position where they think they cannot have any imperfections.

Parents might think, 'Oh, I am a mother/ father! How can I be so stupid? How can I do this?'

Little do we forget, a parent or not, we are still humans. And humans make mistakes. Given that most parents put themselves in this position, they also have a challenge in accepting a mistake they commit and trying to learn from it.

More so, if their own child tries to correct their mistake and share any suggestion, parents feel attacked.

Don't you wonder, why we live in a world, where our parents always feel the need to be superhumans? While there isn't a doubt that they aren't, but what's the harm in making the space more comfortable for them?

  1. Parents, when your kids tell you something. Don't discredit it saying: 'You are a kid, what do you know of the world?' ~ If whatever your child says holds any truth, support them to know more, or rather, you educate them on the topic. ~ If your child holds incorrect factual information, then please help them explore more. Don't wait for the 'right time'.
  2. Kids today are aware of their mental health. If they come to you talking about anxiety or grief, don't push them away with the generic responses of 'Take a nap, you'll get over it'. The Genz want to have a 'dialogue' with you. They want to share their highs and lows. As parents, you can avail them that space to be vulnerable. If they do suffer from something and have the courage to educate you about the condition, try to accept the new normals. Be more accommodating of their needs.
  3. Sex Education is a must today. Your kids want you to learn 'HOW' to talk about it with them without feeling awkward. The most authentic education can only be given to your child by you.
    So if your child asks you questions, be as candid as you can. That's what they want from you. And if they are candid with you, let them be. Yes, the generation gap may bring you many surprises. But as times change and humans evolve, we can only adapt ourselves. So would you, as a parent, let the gap come between your relationship with your child and pus you farther away? Or would you take that step to overcome the changes and try to be a close friend to your child? Not a very challenging quandary!
Research psychologist at Clymbe. She aspires to dwell deeper into mental health in education through art and experimental theories.

Sanyukta Singh

Research psychologist at Clymbe. She aspires to dwell deeper into mental health in education through art and experimental theories.

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